Totalitarian Oppression

 Photo credit: The Georgia Straight

Photo credit: The Georgia Straight

27 February 2013 is a date that will live in infamy and will be remembered by historians throughout the ages. Yet, that fateful day went unnoticed for most Canadians, and was largely ignored by the mainstream media. 

On 27 February 2013, the Supreme Court of Canada issued a type of ruling that western democracies had not seen since the Third Reich or outside of totalitarian regimes such as North Korea or Saudi Arabia. 

On 27 February 2013, the Supreme Court of Canada upheld the criminalization of free speech in Canada, but went a step further: The highest court on the land also criminalizes the speaking of the truth.

In a 97-page ruling in Saskatchewan (Human Rights Commission) v. Whatcott, the Supreme Court of Canada essentially rules that speaking the truth is a crime as long as it offends people.

Specifically, the Justices write that "truthful statements can be presented in a manner that would meet the definition of hate speech", that "truth may be used for widely disparate ends", that "the use of truthful statements should not provide a shield in the human rights context." One of the Justices even writes that "not all truthful statements must be free from restriction."

The final blow is added when the Justices rule that:

To the extent that truthful statements are used in a manner or context that exposes a vulnerable group to hatred, their use risks the same potential harmful effects on the vulnerable groups that false statements can provoke. The vulnerable group is no less worthy of protection because the publisher has succeeded in turning true statements into a hateful message. In not providing for a defence of truth, the legislature has said that even truthful statements may be expressed in language or context that exposes a vulnerable group to hatred.

In other words, the truth will be even more criminal if it refers to any group deemed vulnerable, such as Muslims. 

Welcome to the 4th Reich. Welcome to Canada.

 

 

 

Christopher Bjørnsen

Tromsø, Norway